Research Digest – January 2015: High Interest in ME/CFS Shown in Journal Rankings

Deciphering PEM is a critically important area of research for ME/CFS. Despite the lack of gravity and specificity a term like “post exertional malaise” signifies, research into what it is and how to measure it is some of the most important research – and most popular. The Journal of Translational Medicine ranked two articles dealing with ME/CFS among its most highly accessed for 2014. LEARN MORE…

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Deciphering Post-Exertional Malaise

On September 18, 2014, Dane B. Cook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a Solve ME/CFS Initiative 2011 funded investigator, presented our most popular webinar of the year on the system biology approach his team is taking to provide a clear picture as to what causes post-exertional malaise. In this guest post for our blog, Dr. Cook reviews the material presented and tackles the many questions we received from webinar participants.

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The Importance of a Representative Patient Population for Research

Being able to offer researchers access to ME/CFS patients with demographic and clinical characteristics that represent the full range of people affected with ME/CFS removes a significant hurdle all researchers face. With the SolveCFS BioBank™ we can make ME/CFS research more appealing and accessible. But how do we ensure our SolveCFS BioBank™ is representative of the entire patient population? READ MORE….

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Research Digest – July 2014: Define & Diagnose

In order for patients to be diagnosed, a disease must be defined. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is currently defined by excluding other medical and psychiatric diseases that explain the symptoms. This month we highlight three recent publications tackling the “core” components of ME/CFS that are important to defining and diagnosing the disease. READ MORE…

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Research Digest – June 2014: Neuroinflammation in ME/CFS

Neuroimaging has been used to study the structural, functional and metabolic affects of ME/CFS on the brain in ME/CFS patients for the past 25 years. To date there are about 50 papers in the peer-reviewed biomedical literature describing these findings. This month we highlight three publications that directly demonstrate and implicate neuroinflammation in ME/CFS…

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Research Digest – May 2014: Post-Exertional Malaise

Post-exertional malaise (PEM) is characteristic of ME/CFS – considered a hallmark of the disease.  Despite this hallmark status, research has not defined what PEM is or how to measure it.  Patients describe PEM as a crash that occurs following physical or mental exertion.   In his comments to the IOM and in our May Guest […]

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