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NOVEMBER 2016

RESEARCH 1ST NEWS | NOVEMBER 2016


Dear Friends,

I have the privilege of running a public webinar series at SMCI in which we bring together thought leaders, influencers, and practitioners from multiple disciplines to share ideas and update the community on the most important work in the ME/CFS field. These speaking opportunities create value to the host, guests, and viewers alike. By design, these webinars foster the exchange of ideas and the dissemination of current and relevant information. Such events are core tenets of scholarly activities and continuing medical understanding. I have always considered this task to be one of my most challenging assignments—and for good reasons: invited lectureships are privileges that must be selected with care and thoughtfulness and reserved for change makers and constructive, committed people with valuable insights. This is relevant particularly in our field, where information must be vetted to weed out myths and fallacies.

In this context, it was truly unsettling to learn about the news of an invited speaker lecturing at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on November 9, 2016. For decades, the speaker has been a staunch adversary of studying the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and refuses to… Read More

Yours,

Zaher Nahle
Vice President for Research and Scientific Programs
Solve ME/CFS Initiative

research roundup

Recent Tryptase Study Yields Potential ME/CFS Insight

We recently highlighted a paper published online on October 17, 2016, in the journal Nature Genetics, one of the most rigorous publications in the field of genetics with tantalizing findings. The paper, titled "Elevated basal serum tryptase identifies a multisystem disorder associated with increased TPSAB1 copy number," had two key features that could be potentially relevant to ME/CFS.
 

TO READ MORE, GO HERE.

Disturbing Steps Backward toward Somatization of ME/CFS

Recently, articles have been put out by reputable, mainstream media sources (such as BBC News and The Guardian) that have treated ME/CFS as a psychological disease—despite over 4,000 scientific publications showing underlying biological abnormalities in ME/CFS patients. ME/CFS has very clear and proven biological (not psychological) traits, such as low natural killer cell cytotoxicity, abnormal gut microbiome diversity, cardiovascular abnormalities, etc. 

TO READ MORE, GO HERE.

 

other news

Researchers and Patients Gather for Biannual ME/CFS Conference

The 12th International IACFS/ME joint patient and professional conference took place in late October with significant participation from academia, government agencies, private clinics, patients, advocates, and other stakeholders. This meeting, held every two years, is an opportunity to exchange ideas and updates on the most recent developments in the field.
 

TO READ MORE, GO HERE.

First SMCI MeetME Travel Awardee Attends IACFSME Conference

PhD student Fane Menash from University College London (UCL) met with Dr. Zaher Nahle at the 2016 IACFSME conference last week. Fane was the first recipient of SMCI's MeetME Travel Award Program that facilitates the participation of junior scientists and underrepresented groups in ME/CFS meetings and conferences.

For more information on the MeetME Travel Award Program, GO HERE.


Two NIH ME/CFS Funding Opportunity Announcements Coming in December

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) announced late last month that it would be publishing two separate ME/CFS funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) in early December 2016. The first is for a Data Management and Coordinating Center (DMCC) to facilitate and coordinate research, while the second is for Collaborative Research Centers (CRCs). These are the first ME/CFS-specific FOAs that have been published in many years.
 
While this is promising news, we do not yet know the specifics like the amount of funding that will be available. Also, we won’t see results from these FOAs for several years. Applications will be due no earlier than April 2017, and the earliest estimated award/start date will be in September 2017.  

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