Energy Envelope Assessment Can Help Guide Therapy

Journal Highlights, Managing CFS | 29. May, 2011 by Kim McCleary | 4 Comments

By K. Kimberly McCleary, President & CEO

One of the research studies recently added to PubMed‘s library of citations from the peer-reviewed medical literature is from the ME/CFS Research Group at DePaul University led by Leonard Jason, PhD.  This group has several publications describing an approach to activity management they have termed the “energy envelope.”

The group’s latest paper, “The role of changes in activity as a function of perceived available and expended energy in nonpharmacological treatment outcomes for ME/CFS,” reports on a study of 44 ME/CFS patients. Available and expended energy was rated before beginning a nonpharmacological treatment program. Available and expended energy was rated before beginning a nonpharmacological treatment program. Those who started the program ”within” their energy envelope had more improvement in physicial functioning and fatigue levels compared to those who started the program in an energy deficit. The authors suggest this assessment can help guide individualized approaches to therapy.

If you aren’t familiar with the energy envelope approach to activity management, please read a classic article from the CFIDS Chronicle written by Bruce J. Campbell, PhD, “Managing Your Energy Envelope.” Dr. Campbell has developed several online self-paced courses to help people with CFS implement and personalize this approach. You can learn more about his organization, CFIDS & FM Self-Help, the courses they offer and the resources they provide at http://www.cfidsselfhelp.org/. Dr. Campbell was one of the speakers for our 2010 webinar series; he offered a program on “Minimizing Relapses: Pacing Yourself Through the Holidays” that was presented in November 2010, but includes information that is helpful any time of year. This program also features Dane Cook, PhD, talking about the science of post-exertional relapse. You can view the video recording and the slides. Dr. Campbell also provided a copy of his slides with notes.

Reference

 

Brown, M., Khorana, N. and Jason, L. A. (2011), The role of changes in activity as a function of perceived available and expended energy in nonpharmacological treatment outcomes for ME/CFS. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67: 253–260. doi: 10.1002/jclp.20744

Note: This study has been added to the “CFS Research Findings” page here on Research1st. Information about the pacing webinar was added to this post on May 30, 2011, by the author.

K. Kimberly McCleary has served as the Association’s chief staff executive since 1991

May 29, 2011